E3 2013: How an entire industry completely lost perspective
on Jun 15 by

E3 2013: How an entire industry completely lost perspective

Like every gamer looking on at the events of E3 – I gorged myself on every scrap of information, every presentation and drank in every trailer that crossed my path. For one intensive week, like many, I tried to take it all in – tried to let it form and sculpt my opinion for the year ahead.

 

 

But this year was harder than most. Not because of the lack of information – there was plenty of that – but because of all the SENSELESS SHOUTING.

 

 

Trying to remain objective, impartial, considered is not an easy task in the midsts of all the braying and hollering surrounding the ‘Console War’ (a term that makes a little sick creep into my palate even as I type) and the incessant focus on the rights and wrongs of used games and online check in.

 

I’m not unsympathetic. I get that people are pissed off about the used games thing – though in Microsoft’s defence, this is a decision that is largely in the hands of Publishers, and so it’s unfortunate that Microsoft single handedly shouldered the burden of such a contentious topic.

 

 

Likewise – the decision to make Xbox one require online check in once every 24 hours is bewildering, and again, I understand why some people are going to be upset about it’s restrictions. I have little doubt, for example, that there are inmates in Parkhurst Prison (who’s lack of highspeed internet piped directly into their cells) are gutted that they won’t be able to play Halo 5 for longer than 24 hours.

 

Me? I’m concerned by the decision, certainly, but find myself otherwise unmoved by the restriction. My Xbox has been online once a day for the last four years. Hypothetically speaking, if my internet went down for a week, I might be a little irritated that I couldn’t play Crimson Dragon – but I wouldn’t consider it a breach of my human rights.

 

I’m fairly certain I’d be able to get over it.

 

Regardless, there’s no denying that Microsoft have taken a severe blow this year. Completely misjudging public opinion – or indeed the ferocity with which the internet and social media in particular can completely ravage public image.

 

This is not so much a failing of the hardware itself and more a failure on Microsoft’s PR department – most notably with their handling of the Xbox One’s 24 hour online check in system. If there are benefits to it, Microsoft should have had that ammunition to counter criticism well in advance. They didn’t and could only fumble for ill prepared, feeble excuses while the internet went about the business of sticking the knife in.

 

With this one failure, they allowed Sony to take full advantage and completely divert attention away from what was important (the games dammit) and focus it – laser like – on completely destroying the competition on a PR level.

 

The fact is, what’s done is done. Microsoft have made their decision. Xbox One is what it is, and ultimately consumers will vote with their wallet. I’m not here to sway anyone’s decision either way but I would like to see a line drawn under what is really a separate issue from the entertainment itself. Something that E3, and those reporting on it, seem to have completely missed.

 

My real problem with this year’s E3 has nothing to do what happened at either conference – rather, what didn’t happen.

 

Consider this, if you will.

 

Two of the biggest cheers, the biggest, in the whole of E3 were reserved for two ‘standout moments’ – the PS4’s ‘innovative! sleek! gorgeous!’ hardware design and PS4’s ability to  do what every generation of console has done before – play used games and single player games without online check in.

 

….REALLY?!

 

 

Is this how the unveiling of a new generation should be defined?

 

Am I the only one that finds the fact that these two ‘features’ were the most important, most celebrated of the presentations, more than a little… worrying?

 

At this year’s Press Conference – Sony’s biggest achievement is that it didn’t fuck anything up. I believe the phrase ‘Congratulations! You didn’t shit yourself!’ is most apt here. Not making a fool of yourself is by no means a barometer for future success – lest we forget the disastrous conference of 2006.

 

In the midsts of all the PR willy waving, for me, this E3 is most interesting for the fact that industry and consumers alike were complicit in allowing the used game and online check in debacle to cloud what’s truly important. Stripping everything back to games, and games alone, it wasn’t a particularly earth shattering show in terms of announcements.

 

I’m not saying that the games were bad – but there was little that really stood out as being markedly different, or groundbreaking – and there certainly wasn’t anything revolutionary. All three consoles were guilty of lacking titles that could be seen as genuinely trailblazing. Lots of nice, great, fantastic titles – but nothing that made me cross my legs in the manner of a toddler fit to burst.

 

Everything all felt comfortingly familiar. Similarities to the last generation abound – only a little shinier.

 

When that chasm in visual fidelity between each generation is becoming increasingly slight, the onus must surely be in either remarkable originality and innovation, or a concerted push for exciting new IP and the kind of console exclusives that has a conference audience applauding on it’s feet.

 

 

These were conspicuous by their absence this year.

 

There was almost no real innovation at this show – gameplay wise. One of the most intriguing innovations came from a genre in which I personally hold little interest. The concept of cloud-based AI tinkering in Forza 5 is a genuinely exciting one with a myriad of practical applications outside racing. For me, it was one of the most interesting things to come out of the presentations, not that you’d know it from the lack of column inches or lack of exploration of it’s implications, that it received.

 

Outside a handful of new IP’s, truly awe-inspiring exclusives were also few and far between. Sunset Overdrive, The Order 1886, Crimson Dragon, Titan Fall, Killzone, Ryse, all very welcome, I’ll concede – but all games that riff off existing genres and tropes and ultimately didn’t once threaten to offer much in the way of spine-tingling excitement at their unveiling.

 

Likewise, Nintendo were not without fault either. With the exception of The Wonderful 101 – everything had the whiff of playing it safe – offering just a solid line up key franchises rather than the kind of interesting quirks or second tier favourites (Starfox! F-Zero!) that E3 typically wants to see.

 

For me E3 2013, PR furore aside, proved to be somewhat unspectacular – indicative of an industry increasingly unwilling to take risks, desperate to  consolidate opinion. In this respect, perhaps the biggest risk of all was taken by Microsoft themselves – misguided perhaps – but a risk all the same. Only time will tell how that works out for them.

 

I, for one, am pleased it’s over. I’ll be even more pleased if I never have to read one more article about used games or the necessity for your console to be online every day.

 

I, for one, will be pleased when everyone calms down and we can get back to the business of focusing on what’s important – three great companies concentrating on creating and supporting the kinds of new games and new experiences that made us fall in love with this great entertainment industry in the first place…

 

Until the next time.

ILJG xxx

 

ILJG runs the I Love Japanese Games Facebook Page.
His views are not necessarily those held by Rice Digital or its partners.



  • Isaac Todd

    While I don’t agree with everything in this post, I also feel that this year’s E3 was a disappointment. There were a few cool games, but not many new IPs that actually looked interesting.

  • Isaac Todd

    While I don’t agree with everything in this post, I also feel that this year’s E3 was a disappointment. There were a few cool games, but not many new IPs that actually looked interesting.

  • Hetare Kaiser

    It’s hard to get excited over and celebrate games when in order to play them, you’d need to support a very damaging direction for the industry to go into.

    Also, the “let the marketplace sort them out” stance is very naive. It’s important to raise a big stink about this issue, both to inform people who don’t understand the gravity of the situation and to warn the rest of the industry not to get any funny ideas.

  • Hetare Kaiser

    It’s hard to get excited over and celebrate games when in order to play them, you’d need to support a very damaging direction for the industry to go into.

    Also, the “let the marketplace sort them out” stance is very naive. It’s important to raise a big stink about this issue, both to inform people who don’t understand the gravity of the situation and to warn the rest of the industry not to get any funny ideas.

  • Kitsumeda

    I think Microsoft has done a ton of ridiculous things, the newest being the region lock which blocks half of Europe, the whole Africa and Asia from activating Xbox One games.

    Some of the games that I am really hyped for are probably not going to be released in the next two years (Final Fantasy XV and Kingdom Hearts 3). The rest of the games basically the same things we see every E3.

    At least we have Gamescom and TGS before the launch of the next generation and then we might get a glimpse of some new IPs and if we are really lucky Microsoft might change its mind regarding some of it’s policies.

  • Kitsumeda

    I think Microsoft has done a ton of ridiculous things, the newest being the region lock which blocks half of Europe, the whole Africa and Asia from activating Xbox One games.

    Some of the games that I am really hyped for are probably not going to be released in the next two years (Final Fantasy XV and Kingdom Hearts 3). The rest of the games basically the same things we see every E3.

    At least we have Gamescom and TGS before the launch of the next generation and then we might get a glimpse of some new IPs and if we are really lucky Microsoft might change its mind regarding some of it’s policies.

  • Jorge Tavani

    sony:ps4 deal wiht it

  • Jorge Tavani

    sony:ps4 deal wiht it

  • I Palindrome I

    I actually thought this E3 was good for games, considering the past few years have been dicking around with introducing new features to consoles or fumbling over motion controls. Also, I know that I still wouldn’t buy an Xbox One regardless of DRM/online check-in bullshit (although I acknowledge that it is annoying and completely unnecessary). The real reason I don’t want to get one is because Microsoft is trying to make a smart TV with it. Just their sense of direction with the console turns me away from it because I want video games. Games like Bayonetta 2, X, Titanfall, Destiny, and Super TIME Force don’t require me to purchase an Xbox One so I just won’t get one. Unless you’re really excited to play Ryse: Son of QTE, there’s no reason to get an Xbox One either because the PS4 can do pretty much eveything the Xbox One can do but less expensive.

    Oh and one final note:
    >Expecting innovation
    >E3
    ha. ha. ha haha hahaHAha hahahahahAHAHAHAHAHHAAHHAAA!

  • I Palindrome I

    I actually thought this E3 was good for games, considering the past few years have been dicking around with introducing new features to consoles or fumbling over motion controls. Also, I know that I still wouldn’t buy an Xbox One regardless of DRM/online check-in bullshit (although I acknowledge that it is annoying and completely unnecessary). The real reason I don’t want to get one is because Microsoft is trying to make a smart TV with it. Just their sense of direction with the console turns me away from it because I want video games. Games like Bayonetta 2, X, Titanfall, Destiny, and Super TIME Force don’t require me to purchase an Xbox One so I just won’t get one. Unless you’re really excited to play Ryse: Son of QTE, there’s no reason to get an Xbox One either because the PS4 can do pretty much eveything the Xbox One can do but less expensive.

    Oh and one final note:
    >Expecting innovation
    >E3
    ha. ha. ha haha hahaHAha hahahahahAHAHAHAHAHHAAHHAAA!

  • Hawk Ward

    As much as I would love to agree, it’s hard to deny how much controversy there was about Microsoft from before Sony even pulled any punches on a personal level. My understanding of a games console is that it should be about both video games and its consumers while the companies profit from our support. In what way do consumers benefit from having these restrictions introduced?

    Yes, the regulation could be doing with some clearing over. I also think companies should feel more secure about the system they make their games for with a firm knowledge that sales figures truly tally up to how many units of a game were sold. But again this direction of “DRM” being controversial to the point of being a make or break for consoles is ridiculous beyond reasonable understanding.

    Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo are three great companies with a great variety of gaming to experience, but I feel that steadily each company is starting to strafe into their own. Microsoft appear to be taking the home media approach whilst trying to shape the industry, while Sony and Nintendo cater to a large variety of games catered at their own separate demographics.

    I’m not looking at this negatively, in fact the coined word “diverse” comes to mind. It’s down to the consumers to pick their field and plants their money in it. Personally I see myself not purchasing anything next gen for a while to come, I still think it’s early days, and so I now look forward to PAX.

    But as ILJG said – chill guys, E3 may be over, but it might still have to sink in for some of you. But don’t forget you are entitled to forge an opinion for yourself – lest the world becomes dominated by sentient or artificial intelligence.

  • Hawk Ward

    As much as I would love to agree, it’s hard to deny how much controversy there was about Microsoft from before Sony even pulled any punches on a personal level. My understanding of a games console is that it should be about both video games and its consumers while the companies profit from our support. In what way do consumers benefit from having these restrictions introduced?

    Yes, the regulation could be doing with some clearing over. I also think companies should feel more secure about the system they make their games for with a firm knowledge that sales figures truly tally up to how many units of a game were sold. But again this direction of “DRM” being controversial to the point of being a make or break for consoles is ridiculous beyond reasonable understanding.

    Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo are three great companies with a great variety of gaming to experience, but I feel that steadily each company is starting to strafe into their own. Microsoft appear to be taking the home media approach whilst trying to shape the industry, while Sony and Nintendo cater to a large variety of games catered at their own separate demographics.

    I’m not looking at this negatively, in fact the coined word “diverse” comes to mind. It’s down to the consumers to pick their field and plants their money in it. Personally I see myself not purchasing anything next gen for a while to come, I still think it’s early days, and so I now look forward to PAX.

    But as ILJG said – chill guys, E3 may be over, but it might still have to sink in for some of you. But don’t forget you are entitled to forge an opinion for yourself – lest the world becomes dominated by sentient or artificial intelligence.

  • Blue Odeyssey

    It’s hard to see how Microsoft intend to recover from this unfortunate situation. The hardcore gamers will most likely boycott the Xbox One to protect and maintain their rights. The casual consumer (Your typical COD/FIFA player) will most likely be influenced by the price difference between the PS4. Finally those purchasing for children will more than likely choose the console which doesn’t force them to be online ,as many parents are becoming much more cautious with online enabled products due to the micro transaction issues which have been regularly reported amongst Iphone and Ipad users.

  • Blue Odeyssey

    It’s hard to see how Microsoft intend to recover from this unfortunate situation. The hardcore gamers will most likely boycott the Xbox One to protect and maintain their rights. The casual consumer (Your typical COD/FIFA player) will most likely be influenced by the price difference between the PS4. Finally those purchasing for children will more than likely choose the console which doesn’t force them to be online ,as many parents are becoming much more cautious with online enabled products due to the micro transaction issues which have been regularly reported amongst Iphone and Ipad users.

  • WILL a.k.a ILL WILL

    Big Brother is Moving into your house a.k.a Xbox One, Vs Holy Shizz On a Stick, Sony is FINALLY on level with Xbox 360 a.k.a PS4.. You Decide!!!!

    I’ll wait for reviews from gamers after the systems are released, but I’m leaning towards PS4 for freedom and privacy reasons. And I’m buying a 360 to compare notes LOL

  • WILL a.k.a ILL WILL

    Big Brother is Moving into your house a.k.a Xbox One, Vs Holy Shizz On a Stick Sony is finally on level with Xbox 360 a.k.a PS4.. You Decide!!!!

    I’ll wait for reviews from gamers after the systems are released, but I’m leaning towards PS4 for freedom and privacy reasons.

  • massi4h

    I agree fully. Nothing is shouting “NEXT GEN” to me and even after all this, the only argument Sony have to buy their PS4 is “we do things that MS aren’t doing” not “we have great games and a great system, please buy”.
    Sure they have won in that regard, but they haven’t given me any reason to actually buy a PS4.
    And to be perfectly honest (since I’m not much of a fan of RPGs like KH and FF) if someone were to give me one of these consoles tomorrow I’d pick an Xbox One simply because Killer Instinct is the only game announced from the two that intrigues me.

    • pepz347

      But would you be happy to buy the whole roster for Killer Instinct? Because that’s what has been said.

      • massi4h

        …People are all mixed up. I would buy the whole game. The way it works is that you can get the demo which is the whole game but with only Jago playable. You can then either purchase the whole game like normal, or if you’re more casual you can go for a cheaper option and only purchase the characters you want to. That’s a really good way to sell a fighting game imo.

        • pepz347

          TBH thats a bad way. I mean say your friend comes round and he wants to play as TJ Combo and you didn’t buy it then. Everyone has different view but even if it is a free game as they say, its not a nice way to go about things. Its crazy when Metro Last Light you had to pay the hardest mode but yeah now its turning very scary.

          • massi4h

            The thing is, that was a misunderstanding. It’s not a free-to-play game. The demo is free like most games in existence. If you went to your friends house and he hadn’t bought the game, then of course you’re not going to get to play with the full game. Though since you would have bought TJ Combo, then you could just sign in and use him at your friends house.

          • pepz347

            True and like I said its getting very scary indeed of what could soon be the way we look at gaming. Again Metro Last Light, paying for the hardest mode in the game, Street Fighter X Tekken having the DLC (Disc Locked Content as people called it) been on the disc and having to pay a fee to unlock them. I honestly have to take a step back from the whole console market itself and I know that sounds unfair because Nintendo are there as well. But then as much as I like Nintendo … Something still feels missing from them. Don’t get me wrong they still got the magic touch for a few games like Zelda and other 1st party software, just that I want more of it.

  • massi4h

    I agree fully. Nothing is shouting “NEXT GEN” to me and even after all this, the only argument Sony have to buy their PS4 is “we do things that MS aren’t doing” not “we have great games and a great system, please buy”.
    Sure they have won in that regard, but they haven’t given me any reason to actually buy a PS4.
    And to be perfectly honest (since I’m not much of a fan of RPGs like KH and FF) if someone were to give me one of these consoles tomorrow I’d pick an Xbox One simply because Killer Instinct is the only game announced from the two that intrigues me.

    • pepz347

      But would you be happy to buy the whole roster for Killer Instinct? Because that’s what has been said.

      • massi4h

        …People are all mixed up. I would buy the whole game. The way it works is that you can get the demo which is the whole game but with only Jago playable. You can then either purchase the whole game like normal, or if you’re more casual you can go for a cheaper option and only purchase the characters you want to. That’s a really good way to sell a fighting game imo.

        • pepz347

          TBH thats a bad way. I mean say your friend comes round and he wants to play as TJ Combo and you didn’t buy it then. Everyone has different view but even if it is a free game as they say, its not a nice way to go about things. Its crazy when Metro Last Light you had to pay the hardest mode but yeah now its turning very scary.

          • massi4h

            The thing is, that was a misunderstanding. It’s not a free-to-play game. The demo is free like most games in existence. If you went to your friends house and he hadn’t bought the game, then of course you’re not going to get to play with the full game. Though since you would have bought TJ Combo, then you could just sign in and use him at your friends house.

          • pepz347

            True and like I said its getting very scary indeed of what could soon be the way we look at gaming. Again Metro Last Light, paying for the hardest mode in the game, Street Fighter X Tekken having the DLC (Disc Locked Content as people called it) been on the disc and having to pay a fee to unlock them. I honestly have to take a step back from the whole console market itself and I know that sounds unfair because Nintendo are there as well. But then as much as I like Nintendo … Something still feels missing from them. Don’t get me wrong they still got the magic touch for a few games like Zelda and other 1st party software, just that I want more of it.

  • pepz347

    Okay I’ll be straight up, when Microsoft showed the One and said all it can do, I was very disappointed. Its not for me simply as. They talked about having it as if its a new tv service box and I rarely watch tv. So why would I be wanting that? And lets be honest unless you live in USA then all the channels and stuff won’t be coming to us. Graphically I can’t see that much of a huge leap, power wise … Yeah maybe its there but again not really bothered. And again been honest I do feel that this was more forced to happen which I don’t think is that much of a good idea. I mean really did we need a new generation of console games that bad? Not that I can see. Bioshock Infinite and Tomb Raider showed how amazing they can look this generation already.

    A big problem I got with this Xbox One is the whole system in place and no word of a lie I started calling it the Rent-A-Box because I will no longer be able to OWN my games that I payed money for. I own my 360 games even if the service gets taken down, I can still play them. I don’t need to be on 24/7 and I really don’t like the idea of a camera in my room that needs to be plugged in all the time. No thanks. Sure it could be “off” as people say it is, however its still listening in when you say Xbox on. That still counts as been on. What if I’m having say … A private moment? Sorry but I didn’t sign up to Big Brother.

    Whichever way we look at it some people may enjoy what they are doing. However I’m sorry to say I won’t be one of those people. Sure I’ll miss out on that One Day Achievement for owning it on day one, but … Does that really matter to anyone else out there? Until these problems have been dealt with then I think I’ll be spending the rest of my time as a PC gamer. Its a sad time to be a console gamer with the whole madness going on right now. Its scary even. But for now, I’m happy with playing on my 360 and my DreamCast.

  • pepz347

    Okay I’ll be straight up, when Microsoft showed the One and said all it can do, I was very disappointed. Its not for me simply as. They talked about having it as if its a new tv service box and I rarely watch tv. So why would I be wanting that? And lets be honest unless you live in USA then all the channels and stuff won’t be coming to us. Graphically I can’t see that much of a huge leap, power wise … Yeah maybe its there but again not really bothered. And again been honest I do feel that this was more forced to happen which I don’t think is that much of a good idea. I mean really did we need a new generation of console games that bad? Not that I can see. Bioshock Infinite and Tomb Raider showed how amazing they can look this generation already.

    A big problem I got with this Xbox One is the whole system in place and no word of a lie I started calling it the Rent-A-Box because I will no longer be able to OWN my games that I payed money for. I own my 360 games even if the service gets taken down, I can still play them. I don’t need to be on 24/7 and I really don’t like the idea of a camera in my room that needs to be plugged in all the time. No thanks. Sure it could be “off” as people say it is, however its still listening in when you say Xbox on. That still counts as been on. What if I’m having say … A private moment? Sorry but I didn’t sign up to Big Brother.

    Whichever way we look at it some people may enjoy what they are doing. However I’m sorry to say I won’t be one of those people. Sure I’ll miss out on that One Day Achievement for owning it on day one, but … Does that really matter to anyone else out there? Until these problems have been dealt with then I think I’ll be spending the rest of my time as a PC gamer. Its a sad time to be a console gamer with the whole madness going on right now. Its scary even. But for now, I’m happy with playing on my 360 and my DreamCast.

  • Calum

    I think you’ve taken a very entitled perspective here, on the always online issue: NOT EVERYONE WHO PLAYS VIDEO GAMES HAS INTERNET. The number of areas in America still using dial-up sickens me. To suggest that the always online feature is not a a big issue is to see the issue from the perspective of someone who has comfortable access to internet.

    • pepz347

      Agreed not everyone does which leads so many scenarios. Places still in parts of the UK still don’t have broadband and one place I know on the outskirts of London has very slow broadband. I just don’t buy it and I really feel disappointed in all of this.

  • Calum

    I think you’ve taken a very entitled perspective here, on the always online issue: NOT EVERYONE WHO PLAYS VIDEO GAMES HAS INTERNET. The number of areas in America still using dial-up sickens me. To suggest that the always online feature is not a a big issue is to see the issue from the perspective of someone who has comfortable access to internet.

    • pepz347

      Agreed not everyone does which leads so many scenarios. Places still in parts of the UK still don’t have broadband and one place I know on the outskirts of London has very slow broadband. I just don’t buy it and I really feel disappointed in all of this.

  • Godmars

    MS has their own direct example of what they have to look forward to with requiring online and the Xbox 360. Given than only slightly more than half of them are online. That’s around forty million out of over seventy million over the course of eight years. If nothing changes in the market from the current 360/PS3 gen to the next, they just handed Sony a 2-1 advantage.

  • Godmars

    MS has their own direct example of what they have to look forward to with requiring online and the Xbox 360. Given than only slightly more than half of them are online. That’s around forty million out of over seventy million over the course of eight years. If nothing changes in the market from the current 360/PS3 gen to the next, they just handed Sony a 2-1 advantage.

  • WILL a.k.a ILL WILL

    I was just thinking about something, for all people claiming, Xbox One having a “Bigger Picture”(funny people say BS like that every time something gives people uncertainty). What happens when you lose internet due to service provider problems for more than 24 hours?, which is a situation that is completely unavoidable, you’re negatively effected by this because and I understand you could loose the ability to play you game, until you reestablish a connection to an internet. Also everyone who plays video games have an internet connection, so what do the 360 owners do then? This cannot be defended. I hear another thing Xbox One blind supports like to argue “This is about the Games”, but when we can’t play those games we paid for any time we choose without being Big Brother’d into not being able to play unless we have internet connection, that’s a BIG problem. This also completely shits on service members fighting for our rights who also play video games in their leisure time. This is a problem that will cost Microsoft big in the long run. No matter how you want to slice it, being a Fan of PlayStation or Xbox, Sony just won, because they do not restrict players in ANY way. Xbox 360 owners who ironically doesn’t even like PlayStation are jumping ship because of this BS, that’s a BAD thing when you lose loyal customers. I hear people talking about NWO eventually coming into the video game world, I think with the Xbox One, it just might’ve arrived. Good job Microsoft, or is it “Skynet” now?

  • WILL a.k.a ILL WILL

    I was just thinking about something, for all you Xbox fanboys claiming, Xbox One having a “Bigger Picture”(funny people say BS like that every time something gives people uncertainty). What happens when you lose internet due to service provider problems for more than 24 hours?, which is a situation that is completely unavoidable, you’re negatively effected by this because and I understand you could loose the ability to play you game, until you reestablish a connection to an internet. Also everyone who plays video games have an internet connection, so what do the 360 owners do then? This cannot be defended. I hear another thing Xbox One blind supports like to argue “This is about the Games”, but when we can’t play thoe games we paid for any time we choose without being Big Brother’d into not being able to play unless we have internet connection, this is a problem that will cost Microsoft big in the long run. Sony just won, because they do not restrict players in ANY way. This also completely shits on service members fighting for our rights who also play video games in their leisure time. Good job Microsoft, or is it Skynet now?

  • Hodei

    the most interesting product in the e3 it´s the oculus rift. It could be the next move on videogames

  • Hodei

    the most interesting product in the e3 it´s the oculus rift. It could be the next move on videogames

  • 60hz

    Basically M$ tried to fix the used game problem the wrong way around. I agree with what Nintendo stated, make great games and you wont have a used game crisis. For example, legendary games go UP in value not DOWN.

  • 60hz

    Basically M$ tried to fix the used game problem the wrong way around. I agree with what Nintendo stated, make great games and you wont have a used game crisis. For example, legendary games go UP in value not DOWN.

  • Jade Harris

    I was quite impressed with the level of support Sony showed for indie games at the show. Coupled with their support in bringing Japanese indie games to the West, that could mean a lot of cool niche releases.

  • Jade Harris

    I was quite impressed with the level of support Sony showed for indie games at the show. Coupled with their support in bringing Japanese indie games to the West, that could mean a lot of cool niche releases.

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